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Safe Burglary Ratings Guide

Safe Burglary Ratings can be confusing to understand when trying to find a safe that will just protect your valuables. We have put together a comprehensive explaination of all of the recognized burglary ratings in the safe industry. A safe that is considered burglary rated is typically built from solid steel plating or composite steel with some type of concrete derived insulation. Unless the safe has been U.L. tested & classified, the rating standards are completely up to the individual manufacturer and can vary greatly. 

Burglary Ratings in ascending levels of security are:

“B” Rating (Typically a Minimum of 3/16" to 1/4" thick steel body with a 1/2" thick steel door)

“C” Rating (Typically a Minimum of 1/2" thick steel body with a 1" thick steel door)

“E” Rating (Typically a Minimum of 1" thick steel body with a 1-1/2" thick steel door)

The Underwriters Laboratories (U.L.) is the most accepted means of testing and rating products and services from around the world. U.L. standards have been instilling confidence in products and services that people sell and purchase for over 100 years. They have been testing and certifying safes for a majority of that time. To ensure that a safe continues to uphold the U.L. certification standards initially met during the U.L. testing process, a U.L. representative will routinely visit the manufacturing facilities to perform random inspections.

U.L. RSC Residential Security Container Classification (Minimum 5 minute “net” working time with tools)
U.L. TL-15 Classification (Tool Resistant Door & Front Face)
U.L. TL-30 Classification (Tool Resistant Door & Front Face)
U.L. TRTL-30 Classification (Tool & Torch Resistant Door & Front Face)
U.L. TL-15X6 Classification (Tool Resistant Door & Body)
U.L. TL-30X6 Classification (Tool Resistant Door & Body)
U.L. TRTL-15X6 Classification (Tool & Torch Resistant Door & Body)
U.L. TRTL-30X6 Classification (Tool & Torch Resistant Door & Body)
U.L. TRTL-60X6 Classification (Tool & Torch Resistant Door & Body)
U.L. TXTL-60X6 Classification (Tool, Torch & Explosive Resistant Door & Body)

“B” Ratings Explained

“B” Ratings are, for the most part, non-standardized across the industry. Generally, most of the industry does recognize a B-rated safe as having a 3/16" to 1/4" thick steel body with a 1/2" thick steel door. Locks, re-lockers, hard plates and other security devices are not specified.  The steel thicknesses are also a combined total.  For example, a safe may have an insulating material in between 2 pieces of 1/8" steel in the body and it can still be considered a B-rated safe. Unless it has been UL tested, it is not verified nor are there any formal written standards to which manufacturers must adhere.  This is why “B” Ratings are sometimes referred to as “B” Rate Construction as opposed to “B” Rated. 

Often a manufacturer will distinguish between the rating on the door and the body. Most commonly this is done with in-floor safes since the body’s security is based on the material it is embedded in and the door is more exposed to potential attack. 

“B” Rate Construction or “B” Ratings are most commonly used for cash management safes, depository safes or lock boxes.

“C” Ratings Explained

“C” Ratings are also, for the most part, non-standardized across the industry. A majority of the industry does recognize a C-rated safe as having a 1/2" thick steel body with a 1" thick steel door. Locks, re-lockers, hard plates and other security devices are not specified, but it is very unusual for a manufacturer to design a “C” rate safe without additional security measures.  As with the “B” Rating, the steel thicknesses are a combined total after insulating materials. Unless it has been UL tested, a “C” Rating it also is not verified nor are there any formal written standards to which manufacturers must adhere.  

“C” Rate Construction or “C” Ratings are most commonly used for cash management safes and depository safes, though some in-floor safe manufacturers will offer “C” Rated Doors for higher resistance to a stomping attack.

“E” Ratings Explained

Lastly, “E” Ratings are, for the most part, non-standardized across the industry too. A majority of the industry does recognize an E-rated safe as having a 1" thick steel body with a 1-1/2" thick steel door. Locks, re-lockers, hard plates and other security devices are not specified, but most manufacturers will not produce and advertise an “E” rate safe without additional security measures.  As with the “B” & “C” Ratings, the steel thicknesses are a combined total after insulating materials. Unless it has been UL tested, an “E” Rating it also is not verified nor are there any formal written standards to which manufacturers must adhere.  

“E” Rated safes are pretty uncommon as they employ many of the same specifications as TL-15 rated safes. If a manufacturer is going to product a safe that meets the U.L. TL requirements, then why not just take the additional step to official certification? It’s just not practical. 

UL Ratings – Net Working Time

It is important for you to understand what “Net Working Time” means when it comes to UL classifications. 

Net Working Time is the total amount of time tools actually touched the safe while trying to gain entry. Various tools, normally those found in the typical home, are used during testing process. The goal is to breech the safe and access the contents. In reality it can take a person several hours to accrue only 15 minutes of Net Working Time. 

UL Residential Security Container Ratings (RSC) Explained

The RSC rating is based on a net working time of 5 minutes using a wide variety of household tools against the door.  The RSC rating also states the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2 lock. , RSC rated safes are good for most residential applications that don't require security from professionals with high-powered tools. Household tools used during testing include standard pry/crow bar, a drill with a 1/2 HP motor, hammer, chisel, etc.

UL TL-15 Ratings Explained

The TL-15 rating is based on a net working time of 15 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools against the door.  Also includes an additional 8 minutes of net working time on the body. Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TL-15 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TL-15 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items

UL TL-30 Ratings Explained

The TL-30 rating is based on a net working time of 30 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools against the door.  Also includes an additional 8 minutes of net working time on the body. Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TL-30 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TL-30 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items

UL TRTL-30 Ratings Explained

The TRTL-30 rating is based on a net working time of 30 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools and cutting torches against the door.  Also includes an additional 8 minutes of net working time on the body. Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TRTL-30 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, cutting torches, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TRTL-30 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items

UL TL-15X6 Ratings Explained

The TL-15X6 rating is based on a net working time of 30 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools against the door.  It Also includes an additional 15 minutes of net working time on each side of the body (all six sides). Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TL-15X6 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TL-15X6 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items.

UL TL-30X6 Ratings Explained

The TL-30X6 rating is based on a net working time of 30 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools against the door.  It Also includes an additional 30 minutes of net working time on each side of the body (all six sides). Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TL-30X6 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TL-30X6 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items.

UL TRTL-15X6 Ratings Explained

The TRTL-15X6 rating is based on a net working time of 15 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools and cutting torches against the door.  It also includes an additional 15 minutes of net working time on each side of the body (all six sides). Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TRTL-15X6 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, cutting torches, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc.. TRTL-15X6 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items.

UL TRTL-30X6 Ratings Explained

The TRTL-30X6 rating is based on a net working time of 30 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools and cutting torches against the door.  It also includes an additional 30 minutes of net working time on each side of the body (all six sides). Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. Unlike the RSC, which uses standard household tools, the TRTL-30X6 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. .  These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, cutting torches, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TRTL-30X6 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items.

UL TRTL-60X6 Ratings Explained

The TRTL-60X6 rating is based on a net working time of 60 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools and cutting torches against the door.  It also includes an additional 60 minutes of net working time on each side of the body (all six sides). Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. The TRTL-60X6 uses very high powered tools that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. These tools include high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, cutting torches, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TRTL-60X6 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items.

UL TXTL-60X6 Ratings Explained

The TXTL-60X6 rating is based on a net working time of 60 minutes using a wide variety of high powered tools, cutting torches nitroglycerine or other high explosives against the door.  It also includes an additional 60 minutes of net working time on each side of the body (all six sides). Specifies the minimum rating required for any lock used on the safe as a U.L. Group 2M lock. The TXTL-60X6 uses very high powered tools, cutting torches & explosives that would be employed by professional locksmiths and thieves. These tools include small amounts of explosives, high-speed drills utilizing tungsten-carbide drill bits, cutting torches, grinders, abrasive wheels, power saws, hole saws, pry bars, wedge, sledge hammer, etc. TXTL-60X6 rated safes tend to be purchased by Jewelers, Collectors, and anyone that is looking to protect high-value items. They are extremely heavy and expensive safes.

 


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